To analyze your data and evaluate its business worth, ask yourself the following questions:

If the data is lost, how soon would I need it back?
What should be the minimum amount of time for accessing the data?
How long would I need to store the data?
What will be the level of security?
Which regulatory requirements should be fulfilled?

Not all data is precious. We tend to store things we don't need because we're used to having virtually endless ability to do so. Personally, I haven't bothered to delete anything in my inbox in years and I have thousands of old emails taking up space, but they aren't hurting anyone, and I know I'm not alone in this Passive Packrat Practice. I will never need to access that data, and if I were making a business decision with my personal email, I would start deleting. 

Creative content, however, is different. If it was lost, you would need it back immediately for the team to meet their deadline. You would need to be able to access the data through multiple work-stations throughout the duration of the project, you would want to keep it forever, and only the team has access to the raw footage. Just about every one of those questions leads you to the conclusion that your creative content is, indeed, more important than my personal inbox. 

We only want to talk about the things it makes sense to save, not just keep recommending bigger and bigger storage. With redundancy in drives the important files are saved and mirrored, which is more space-efficient than saving the file twice manually while still ensuring the safety of your content. We also want to help identify the things that aren't as important, or that merely need to be archived, so that we build what you need and only what you need and save the space for the creative content.

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